• 1 To Russia with Love: Virginia-bred wins Russian Derby to head strong regional showing
  • 2 Shakin All Over
  • 3 Hopes, dreams at 30: Anniversary spurs thoughts of past, future in West Virginia
  • 4 Jumpers train at Pimlico to overcome dry summer
  • 5 One last trip to the Timonium sale
  • 6 Hey racing, what’s the big idea?
  • 7 La Ville Rouge
  • 8 So long, Demonstrative
  • 9 The Mission Continues
  • 10 Push and Pull
  • To Russia with Love: Virginia-bred wins Russian Derby to head strong regional showing

    Representatives from Barsuk T. L. Farm went to a familiar and proven source when shopping for racing prospects at the 2014 Keeneland September yearling sale and fortunately Virginia’s Audley Farm supplied consignor Brookdale Sales with just the type of colt the Russian agents were looking to buy.
    Read More
  • Shakin All Over

    In 1989, Tim Woolley headed to Delaware Park’s paddock sale with a modest bankroll and an eye toward launching his training career. Woolley had by then been freelancing as an exercise rider at Fair Hill Training Center and Delaware Park for two years, and one of his regular mounts was a 3-year-old filly named Shakin All Over in the barn of Patti Miller. When word came that the Florida-bred daughter of It’s Freezing and the Navajo mare Andthebeatgoeson had been consigned, Woolley thought the small but gritty filly would be a great first project.
    Read More
  • Hopes, dreams at 30: Anniversary spurs thoughts of past, future in West Virginia

    “I didn’t believe it,” Buck Woodson said. “I couldn’t believe it.” Even then, nearly 30 years past, doubt had no residence in Woodson’s West Virginia stable, the space long occupied by back-at-the-knees sensation Onion Juice. Race after marvelous race, the conformational misfit had outrun better-made rivals, winning stakes, stoking hope, assuring Woodson that certain gallant homebreds surmount odds far beyond the tote board.
    Read More
  • Jumpers train at Pimlico to overcome dry summer

    They’ve been training horses forever – OK, it only feels like it – at Baltimore’s Pimlico Race Course. Training hours involve horses of every age, size, shape and era. Even steeplechasers. Old Hilltop used to card jump races, back when photos were black and white and the jumps were natural brush. Jump racing returned for a bit in more recent times – the track hosted the Joe Aitcheson Stakes two days before the Preakness for several years – then went away again.
    Read More
  • One last trip to the Timonium sale

    Plunked down in the middle of the strip malls of suburban Baltimore is a place. This place is the Maryland State Fairgrounds. Home to conferences, cat shows, and yes, the state fair, I know it better as a racetrack and home of Fasig-Tipton Midlantic Thoroughbred sales. 
    Read More
  • Hey racing, what’s the big idea?

    Carol Holden and Sam Huff dreamed up the West Virginia Breeders Classics and – although I wish they added an apostrophe – created something wild and wonderful. Now 30 years old, it’s a night to be proud of West Virginia’s Thoroughbred industry.
    Read More
  • La Ville Rouge

    It’s an oft-repeated scene. A caring, responsible breeder/owner walks into a field and points out a cherished, pensioned broodmare. She tells of how much the horse has meant to her family and her entire operation. These are the good stories; the happy endings.
    Read More
  • So long, Demonstrative

    The million was for us anyway, not him. We wanted him to join McDynamo, Good Night Shirt and Lonesome Glory as the only American-based steeplechasers to reach $1 million in earnings. He really didn’t care.
    Read More
  • The Mission Continues

    Three years in, The Foxie G Foundation comes of age with TCA Award of Merit.
    Read More
  • Push and Pull

    A small procession of cars filed up the manicured lane at Renee Townsley’s Greystone Farm in Monkton, Md. Jack and Sheila Fisher emerged from their car. Sheila’s parents, Rufus and Sheila Williams, parked theirs a few feet away. Loaded with carrots, the group walked into Townsley’s so-clean-you-could-eat-off-the-floors barn.
    Read More

Thoroughbred Legacies


Past, present, and future pillars of our region.

Read On


Pensioners on Parade

By Maggie Kimmitt

Regional thoroughbreds star in second careers.

Read On


By Joe Clancy

There's always something on editor Joe Clancy's mind.

Read On

Post Time

  • The shadow

    The shadow

    Convey, a mare at the Safely Home division of Dark Hollow Farm in Upperco, Md., stops the camera of Lucas Richardson during a summer visit. Richardson, who turns 9 on Oct. 11, won a blue ribbon in the Maryland State Fair photo contest for the image – judged the best in the Animals (black and white) division for photographers under age 16.
  • Big Sky Country

    Big Sky Country

    Laurel Park does its best Montana impression as a runner heads back to the barn in August. Jim McCue photo.
  • Pony Ride

    Pony Ride

    The day after her 600th win, Maryland-based jockey Forest Boyce (right, aboard July 2015 Pensioner on Parade My Lord) leads out some Green Spring Valley Hounds pony camp riders June 20. Boyce was joined at the head of the group by Maryland Hunt Cup winner Liz McKnight. Carol Fenwick photo
  • Family Portrait

    Family Portrait

    Ben’s Cat heads to the Pimlico paddock accompanied by his half-brothers Pair (left, Doug Leatherman aboard) and Hound (Kerry Hohlbein).Lydia A. Williams photo.
  • Hey, It's a Maryland-bred

    Hey, It's a Maryland-bred

    Sister Keys showed off her day-old baby Purple Rain (in honor of Prince, of course) at Seven Dots Farm in Butler, Maryland. Anne Litz photo.
  • Senior Moment

    Senior Moment

    Hansel, who won the Preakness Stakes 25 years ago, enjoys a regal retirement at Lazy Lane Farms in Virginia. At 28, the Virginia-bred is the oldest North American classic winner. Champion 3-year-old of 1991, he won the Preakness and Belmont Stakes and earned more than $2.9 million for Lazy Lane and trainer Frankie Brothers. Douglas Lees photos
  • Final Salute

    Final Salute

    The New Castle County (Del.) Police Department's mounted patrol unit stands at attention at the funeral of Harford County Sheriff's Senior Deputy Patrick Dailey in February in Maryland.
  • Snow Angel

    Snow Angel

    Retired champion Declan's Moon enjoys a roll in the snow from the blizzard of 2016 at Maryland's Country Life Farm. Ellen B. Pons photo.
  • Dawn Patrol

    Dawn Patrol

    Training starts with the sun at Fair Hill Training Center, and all around the region. Kathee Rengert photo
  • The Last Gallop

    The Last Gallop

    The Last Gallop. Triple Crown winner and Horse of the Year American Pharoah enjoys his morning work at Keeneland before the Breeders’ Cup. Lydia A. Williams photo
  • Where's Waldo

    Where's Waldo

    Trainer Shug McGaughey’s exercise riders at Fair Hill Training Center are dressed for Halloween, but could pass for Santa’s elves too. The horses don’t seem to care. Kathee Rengert photo
  • Sky Riders

    Sky Riders

    Paris Vegas (right) and Gnostic head back to be unsaddled after a flat race at the Shawan Downs steeplechase meet Sept. 26. Trained by Elizabeth Voss, the Maryland-based stablemates finished first and third, respectively, for jockeys Jack Doyle and Gus Dahl. Lydia A. Williams photo.
  • Flying solo.

    Flying solo.

    Millionaire Eighttofasttocatch, a 12-time stakes winner who retired from the track in December 2014 at age 8, shows off his new skill as an event horse, with a hot-air balloon as a backdrop, at the Maryland State Fair for rider Rumsey Keefe. ©Anne Litz Photo.
  • Fit for a King

    Fit for a King

    Monmouth Park went all out – including a custom-wrapped van – to welcome American Pharoah to the Haskell.
  • Smooth Sailing

    Smooth Sailing

    Madeline Murphy and Bonnie take a dip during the Green Spring Valley Hounds summer pony camp. Carol Fenwick photo.
  • Triple Vision

    Triple Vision

    American Pharoah sees all while getting a bath at Churchill Downs. Six days later, he became racing's 12th Triple Crown winner and first since 1978. Mary M. Meek/Eclipse Sportswire.
  • Sidesaddle


    Sean McDermott hangs on to Choral Society at the Queens Cup in North Carolina. Tod Marks.
  • The Feet

    The Feet

    Hooves flash and fly on the turn at Laurel Park. Lydia A. Williams
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Top Midlantic-bred Poll with The Racing Biz

  • Older Horses

    Older Horses

    Stellar Wind blows to top of division
    Stellar Wind (VA)
    Page McKenney
    Finest City
  • Three-year-olds


    Cathryn Sophia, pictured as a yearling in 2014, tops the three-year-old division for Midlantic-breds.
    Cathryn Sophia (MD)

    Tom's Ready
    Mor Spirit
    Sunny Ridge
    Dark Nile
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Trevor McCarthy. Jim McCue photo

Trevor McCarthy didn’t search for a description, didn’t hesitate for an explanation.

“Awesome,” McCarthy said.

For a young man, there is no better word. Most 18-year-olds, fresh out of high school, use the word to describe a party, a girl, a car, a game, a Tweet. For young jockey McCarthy, the word described his career moment, a four-win extravaganza at Laurel Park on New Year’s Day.

The seven-pound apprentice partnered favorite Kincaid for Dale Capuano to win the second, hustled second choice Merryland Moon for Mike Trombetta to win the fourth, upset the fifth with Bluegrass Kopp for Ferris Allen and won the seventh with Proud Daddy for Linda Albert.

Four wins for four trainers on a competitive circuit to open the year?–?yes, awesome.

But it wouldn’t be fair to write this as a story about an awesome jockey or an awesome day. It’s more about an awesome legacy and the awesome responsibility that comes with it.

Trevor McCarthy is the son of retired jockey Michael McCarthy, winner of 2,907 races in a long, respected career that finished in 2002. Dad combined good hands, diplomacy, dedication and street smarts to produce six consecutive 200-win seasons while riding predominantly at Delaware Park. McCarthy managed to fold his lawn-chair frame into an aerodynamic shell, becoming one of the most stylish, successful jockeys in the country. He could get horses to settle in the morning and run in the afternoon. McCarthy was as good an agent as he was a jockey, working the backside like a mayor running for reelection. All the while, his youngest of three children watched, noted and made plans.

He was the one who woke up Dad to go to the track. He was the one who kicked and screamed when his mother tried to take him home from the track. He was the one who borrowed Dad’s extra helmet and whip and rode races around the living room. When Dad became a trainer, Trevor was the one who rode horses around the shedrow (since he was too young to ride on the track). He was the one who jumped fences around Dad’s barn at Fair Hill Training Center. He was the one who killed time at school, waiting for when he could be turned loose at the track.

“I’ve always been into it, I couldn’t see myself doing anything other than the horses,” Trevor said. “I remember watching him ride big races, going to the jocks’ room, going to the Meadowlands at night, stuff like that. He’s taught me everything. I can’t list it all. So much advice, it’s really helped me out. Saving ground, looking good, just a lot of technique, things in the gate, he taught me to be polite.”

Michael McCarthy says he had no choice when it came to Trevor’s chosen profession. He remembers the first time his son showed interest. He was sitting at the dinner table, Trevor looked up from his vegetables (the rest of the family ate what Dad ate) and asked what it felt like to be in the gate. He was 6. And serious.

Other mornings, Trevor would get dressed and wait for his father to get up and go to the track.

“You know when you feel somebody creeping up on you and they’re looking at you, he was standing by the bed at 3:30 in the morning, ‘OK, Dad, let’s go to the racetrack,’ ” Michael said. “That’s what I’m dealing with, with that kid, he just wanted to be a part of it. I’m so happy for him because of that, it’s all he ever wanted to do. Just get out there with the horses and ride the horses. Whatever it takes to get to the track, that’s his mentality.”

Michael McCarthy trained horses for seven years after he retired from riding races. Trevor was there, shed-rowing horses when he was 9. Yes, 9. From there, he got on the lead pony, then galloped for Graham Motion at Fair Hill Training Center and began riding as an amateur through the Amateur Riders Club of America. He rode his first race?–?won his first race?–?in October.

Christa McCarthy told her son he could do anything he wanted after he graduated from high school. Trevor graduated from Alexis I. duPont High in Wilmington, Del., in May and was at Parx by October. Trevor began with a bang, but then was put on the back burner, by design. Dad made sure son gained experience without compromising his apprentice year which starts after five wins. Trevor won his fifth race Dec. 2 and moved his tack to Laurel. Joined with Scott Silver, agent for Jeremy Rose, Trevor plans to stay at Laurel for the rest of the year, aiming at an Eclipse Award for leading apprentice, if possible.

“Well, you know, we had a rough start at Philly, we rode a lot of bad horses but in the last month, when we came to Laurel, it’s picked up a lot, we’ve got a lot of business and a lot of wins down there,” Trevor said. “My dad’s really proud of it. I won my fourth on Proud Daddy, so a lot of people called and told me he must be proud. I always saw my dad doing it, I always looked up to him and when he started training, he taught me how to do it. My dad is loving it.”

And hating it.

Michael McCarthy knows the game; the good, the bad and the ugly. At 5’9½”, McCarthy honed his body to the bone, practicing moderation and discipline while escaping Finger Lakes, landing at Philadelphia Park and flourishing at Delaware Park. He knows the deprivation, the politics, the risk, the hot box, the falls, the hours . . . yeah, the good, the bad, the ugly.

Thoroughbred racing is the ultimate catch-22. Horsemen love their horses, but they put them at risk. Owners love the sport, it costs crazy money. Jockeys love to ride, they diet, fall, ride seven days a week. Fathers, well fathers, love their sons.

“People say you must be a proud dad. . .
and I am in every sense of the word, but when I watch a race, I know so many things can happen negatively, I want to be like, ‘yeah, yeah, do this, do that,’ and instead I’m like ‘OK, look out for this, look out for that,’ ” Michael said. “I was more like that in the first two months, when we were just really preparing him for everything. I’m better now, my fear is subsiding a little bit, but I still get some jitters. I don’t know. I don’t know. I’m sure all fathers would feel the same way.”

Michael worries about too much publicity too fast for Trevor. He worries about expectations put on his son, because of him.

“When you called, I thought, this is a little quick for him, here’s more expectations,” Michael said to a writer. “I think the expectations were so high for him, he won with his first three mounts, then he went 2-for-70 or whatever, but we literally gave him three horses with chances, and those three all did good. I was OK with that, because I knew it was going to take him a few months to get his legs under him, timing-wise it was perfect, we wanted to get him started close to the first of the year, so maybe he can have a chance at winning an award if it’s possible.”

Michael has helped choreograph his son’s career, putting his experiences and connections to good use, but he also apologizes if he sounds like a crazy father, overzealous and consumed by his son’s success. He’s not Earl Woods, driving his son Tiger to become champion of the world. He’s a retired jockey who might be able to help his son become a successful jockey.

“We made a little plan and said ‘let’s try to do this.’ To me, if he goes out there and is happy just being a jockey, making a living, I’m happy for him,” Michael said. “If he wants to go and be a big-time jockey and set huge goals for himself, hey, that’s fine too. That’s the kind of parents we are to him.”

Michael McCarthy would like to see his son make it big. But for his son, not for him.

“He has put that to the side,” Michael said. “He realizes, ‘I might not be my dad or as good as my dad but I’m going to be the best that I can.’ He told me that the other day and I said, ‘Great Trev, but look what you did today, you’ve already made a name for yourself. I’m so proud of that.’ That’s a big hurdle for him. So many jockeys’ sons can’t meet the expectations of their fathers, I feel bad for that situation when it happens to kids. I have a fear of that.”

Nine of the 41 Eclipse Award-winning apprentices cultivated their careers in Maryland. Trevor McCarthy, fresh off winning four races on New Year’s Day, knows their names, their achievements, their legacies?–?Chris McCarron, Ron Franklin, Alberto Delgado, Allen Stacy, Kent Desormeaux, Mike Luzzi, Mark Johnston, Jeremy Rose, Ryan Fogelsonger.

“Yup,” McCarthy said. “Hopefully we can make it 10.”

He said it with respect, not audacity or arrogance. A boy trying to make it big, a son trying to follow his father. The boy doesn’t know what’s out there, the father certainly does.

A few hours after answering his phone the first time, Michael McCarthy called back and left a message. Not as a jockey, not as an agent, not as a trainer, but simply a father.

“Hey, it’s Michael McCarthy calling back, listen, you know I just wanted to say that sometimes this business consumes me and I can sound negative at times, but I just wanted you to know, my wife and I are extremely proud of Trevor,” McCarthy said. “I just wanted to make a notation of that. He’s carrying on our name and my name quite well, he carries himself with so much class, I couldn’t be any more proud of having my son do what he’s doing. I hope you can put that in there.”

Duly noted. Now, kid, go win some races. Dad, enjoy it.

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Say It Again

  • “It would probably cost you more to repair it than it’s worth.”

    Jockey Mark Beecher, who didn’t worry about anyone stealing his tack while getting his picture taken at the Grand National
  • “Don’t worry, I do nice things for him all the time and he tries to bite me.”

    Win Lewis, as Raven’s Choice tried to snap the pen 
out of Joe Clancy’s hand after the Grand National
  • “Who do you boss around when I’m not here?”

    PennVet surgeon Dr. Dean Richardson, to staff communications specialist 
Louisa Shepard (who reminded him about an appointment with a reporter)
  • “I’ve never met you, but I hear you’re OK.”

    Maryland Horse Industry Board chairman Jay Griswold, about to make a point to National Steeplechase Association president Guy Torsilieri
  • “If you need a jockey, you can always marry one.”

    Steeplechase trainer Kate Dalton, who gets first call from her husband Bernie, while answering a question at an owners’ seminar
  • “Obviously quite poorly.”

    Breeder Stuart Grant, who sold potential Kentucky Derby starter Mor Spirit 
for $85,000 as a yearling, on how he decides which young horses to keep and which to sell
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