Post Time

  • Ass Kicker.

    Ass Kicker.

    Pennsylvania-bred and Maryland-sired Army Mule rolls away from the field (and past the parking garage) to win the Grade 1 Carter Handicap at Aqueduct April 7.
  • SPRING COLORS

    SPRING COLORS

    April means steeplechase season in the Carolinas (like Aiken here) and beyond.
  • Iron horses

    Iron horses

    Actually, they’re bronze. The first editions of Maryland’s Renaissance Awards await their patina at the foundry.
  • Dashing Through The Snow

    Dashing Through The Snow

    While not quite as fast as the 1970s Pennsylvania-bred legend, this red fox kept pace just fine during a December snowstorm at Parx Racing.
  • Hunting Party

    Hunting Party

    Maryland’s Green Spring Valley Hounds head out for their 125th Opening Day in November.
  • HORSES IN THE MIST

    HORSES IN THE MIST

    The equine life at Shamrock Farm in Woodbine, MD., took on an ethereal look on a September Morning. Photo by Christie Steele
  • See Horses

    See Horses

    A mare and foal find their reflections while getting a drink at Maryland’s Country Life Farm.
  • GHOSTS IN THE MIST

    GHOSTS IN THE MIST

    Announcer Dave Rodman must have had fun with this one. Thoroughbreds charge through the gloaming during a rainstorm at Laurel Park in July.
  • Galloping Ghost

    Galloping Ghost

    Retired MD-bred turf star Better Talk Now, who died of colic in June at age 18, puts in some work on a frosty turf course at Churchill Downs.
  • Taste Of Maryland

    Taste Of Maryland

    Lead pony rider Alena Marchant gets some refreshment on Black-Eyed Susan Day at Pimlico.
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  • 1 One of a kind, Timonium ready for another sale
  • 2 Art Student
  • 3 Why Timonium?: Mix of factors push May sale to new heights
  • 4 Slow Down?: Fast times matter at breeze show, but there’s always plenty more to it
  • 5 Catalog Surfing: Two-year-olds boast plenty of promise in advance of sale
  • 6 Rick Buckley wins Jerry Frutkoff Preakness Photography Award
  • 7 Tom Law wins David F. Woods Award for best Preakness coverage
  • 8 Under Cover
  • 9 Remembering Ronnie Franklin
  • 10 Afternoon Deelites
  • One of a kind, Timonium ready for another sale

    The snack-bar at the Timonium sales pavilion would make good material for a comedian, or some sort of social experiment. Where else would a guy buy a $10 lunch on a plastic plate minutes after spending $1.5 million on a horse? 
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  • Art Student

    Smitten. In simplest terms, the word means to impress favorably; to emotionally affect with a strong or sudden feeling. And in classic stream-of-consciousness rhetoric, it’s a word forever linked to 24-year-old retired broodmare Art Student.
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  • Why Timonium?: Mix of factors push May sale to new heights

    Why Timonium? Hey, it’s a question. Especially when you start to think about most of the other venues for North America’s public Thoroughbred auctions – Lexington, Saratoga, Ocala, Gulfstream Park, Del Mar and so on.  Good old Timonium would not win anyone’s glitz and glamour contest, nor would the sales pavilion
    Read More
  • Slow Down?: Fast times matter at breeze show, but there’s always plenty more to it

    Big stride, nice eye, great walk, enough pedigree to make people notice . . . so where are all the potential buyers? If history is any indicator, they’re a few stalls down the shedrow or in the next barn looking at a horse who worked a fraction of a second faster at the
    Read More
  • Catalog Surfing: Two-year-olds boast plenty of promise in advance of sale

    Some 600 horses will fill the stable area at Timonium, Md., for Fasig-Tipton Midlantic’s annual sale of 2-year-olds this month. Though some people do manage – somehow – seeing them all is a challenge.   Simply, it’s a big group of horses. They were bred in 15 states (one each from Arkansas
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  • Rick Buckley wins Jerry Frutkoff Preakness Photography Award

    Rick Buckley will be awarded the Jerry Frutkoff Preakness Photography Award for best Preakness picture of 2017. The photo appeared on our July 2017 cover!
    Read More
  • Tom Law wins David F. Woods Award for best Preakness coverage

    Tom Law, senior writer for Mid-Atlantic Thoroughbred and managing editor for ST Publishing Inc., will be awarded the David F. Woods Memorial Award for excellence in journalism Thursday, May 17 at the Alibi Breakfast at Pimlico Race Course. Law will be recognized by the Maryland Jockey Club for his story “Under
    Read More
  • Under Cover

    The days ticked away last summer at Saratoga Race Course as the meeting loomed and Chad Brown prepared to launch the careers of two colts bought for one of his main clients at the same yearling sale almost a year before.Both were by promising young stallions and Brown ranked them
    Read More
  • Remembering Ronnie Franklin

    Ronnie Franklin died in March. At 58. Obituaries listed the cause of death as lung cancer, but substance abuse played a role. Franklin lived hard, and fast. At Delaware Park in 1978, he was just getting started, as part of a colony that included other young hot shots Tommy Kupfer
    Read More
  • Afternoon Deelites

    Burt Bacharach. Universally recognizable, it’s a name that brings to mind timeless titles and lyrics penned by one of the most prolific and successful songwriters of the 20th century. Millions can readily answer that Bacharach wrote “What The World Needs Now Is Love,” “Raindrops Keep Fallin’ On My Head,” “I’ll
    Read More

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2018 Top Midlantic-bred Poll with The Racing Biz

  • Still Having Fun (MD) Blamed (MD) Enchanted Ghost (MD) Limited View (MD) Global Citizen (MD)
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A few days before this magazine went to press, I read an article by associate editor Cindy Deubler and thought about October.

The year’s 10th month includes the Maryland Million, the West Virginia Breeders Classics, the Far Hills Races, champion-ship races at Belmont Park, the first day of the Breeders’ Cup and plenty of other big events in Thoroughbred racing. Other than Triple Crown time and August in Saratoga, October might be racing’s most glossy postcard. 

joeclancy2But Deubler’s feature on the Foxie G Foundation and the plight of some Thoroughbreds it rescued, shoved aside the bright, shiny stuff for a moment.

We’ll run the article in a future magazine, but (in short) the foundation, a horse rescue created by Laurie Calhoun in Maryland, received a call two years ago about some neglected Thoroughbred mares. Their owner had acquired them for breeding purposes, planning to simply give away the foals in hopes of collecting breeder bonuses. It never really panned out. He didn’t follow the steps necessary for Jockey Club registration, he didn’t even plan for adequate care.

Ultimately, the owner came under scrutiny from authorities, charges were filed, the SPCA took in the horses and he was convicted of animal cruelty in Pennsylvania.

But that didn’t even cover all the horses he owned. There were more in Maryland in a similar plight. The result is a ghastly tale of Thoroughbreds left to fend for themselves in a field with no shelter, no visits from the blacksmith, no veterinary examinations and no care save for a sympathetic farmer who gave them some hay.

And that’s where Foxie G got involved. Some mares were pregnant. Some had foals by their sides. All were in need of food, shelter and basic care.

They needed human intervention, and got it.

Calhoun, her husband Jerry and a team of other Thoroughbred volunteers dove in. They didn’t wait for a study. They didn’t consider the economic impact. They didn’t appoint a spokesperson or schedule a meeting. They went to work.

They saved the horses they could, they did some investigative work to uncover pedigrees and race records, they contacted former owners, they worked with the foals, they found homes. Two years later, many are leading productive lives. A 2-year-old filly awaits Jockey Club approval to begin a racing career. A yearling colt was named grand champion Thoroughbred at the Maryland State Fair’s yearling show.

Remember the horses. I guess that’s the point of such a cautionary story.

They were bred for racing, for the sport. They can’t be abandoned. Owners and breeders must be responsible for the horses’ welfare. You can’t give your horse away and assume someone will care for it the way you did. You can’t simply wash your hands of an animal.

This magazine celebrates the Thoroughbred and the people who take part in racing’s big events. We get a chance to cover Thoroughbred majesty on the racetrack. We get the opportunity to profile ex-racehorses who get second chances in the Pensioners on Parade feature. We get to follow the career arcs of yearlings who top the sales, stallions who lead the standings, broodmares who produce winners.

But while you’re celebrating this month, think about Foxie G and all the other organizations doing good work out there. For theirs is a job that’s never finished.

The Foxie G Foundation holds its annual fundraiser Oct. 31, this year titled Witches, Whinnies and Whiskers. . .Oh My!, at Boordy Vineyards in Hydes, Md. Contact Laurie Calhoun at (301) 667-2553 for information.

Say It Again

  • "I'm trying to think like I'm not cold."
    Mike Trombetta In the paddock at Laurel Feb. 17th
  • "Oh, that's because Nick Zito and I like to talk like we're from the Godfather when we talk horses, you know, 'Barzini...Tattaglia...it's just business."
    De Julio on why Locust Point was purchased under the name Barzini Syndicate.
  • "I could go back and watch it three times and still not know what happened."
    Trainer John Servis On trying to watch Ms Locust Point's Barbara Fritchie win through the snow. (live and/or on television)
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Popular Stories

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Connections

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